Guidelines For Measuring Relationships in Public Relations

November 1999 – In order to answer the question — “How can PR practitioners begin to pinpoint and document for senior management the overall value of public relations to the organization as a whole?” — different tools and techniques are needed. The authors have found through their research that perceptions regarding an organization”s longer-term relationships with key constituencies can best be measured by focusing on six very precise elements or components of relationships discussed in this paper.

6 Comments

  1. Julie Roe — September 19th, 2012 at 9:25 am

    As a graduate learner at Capella University, I am requesting permission to use the PR Relationship Scale instrument developed by Hon and Grunig (1999) to conduct my dissertation research study titled “Donor Perceived Relationships With Nonprofits Using Social Media: A Quantitative Correlational Study” under the direction of my mentor, Dr. Bruce Lazar.

    The purpose of the academic research study is to determine if a connection exists between developing donor relationships through social media exchanges with a nonprofit organization and enhanced relational attributes.

    The primary activity will be the employment of an electronic survey to examine donor perceptions of their communal relationship with a nonprofit organization.

    Please confirm permission to use the established relationship scale instrument and/or if any monetary cost is associated with it.

    Thank you for your considerations,

    Julie Roe

  2. Jennifer Moyer — September 19th, 2012 at 9:29 am

    Julie,

    You are allowed to use this paper for your dissertation. Please abide by our Fair Use Policy, http://www.instituteforpr.org/about/fair-use/.

    Best of luck!
    Jenn
    Institute for Public Relations

  3. Larry Lesick — October 12th, 2012 at 2:33 pm

    I have been engaged by Hilbert College (NY) to help improve its services to students in its one stop center. I am requesting permission to use the PR Relationship Scale instrument developed by Hon and Grunig (1999) to determine students’ perceptions of their relationships with the center. An electronic survey will be employed to provide an initital baseline of perception of services. After processes have been improved a second survey will be employed to measure perceived improvements in service.

    Please confirm permission to use the established relationship scale instrument and/or if any cost is associated with it.

    Thank you for your consideration,

    Lawrence T. Lesick, Ph.D.

  4. Jennifer Moyer — October 15th, 2012 at 7:34 am

    Hi Larry,
    Please abide by the Institute for Public Relations’ fair use policy. The link can be found on my previous post on this page.

    Best of luck!
    Jenn
    Institute for Public Relations

  5. pauliina — January 9th, 2013 at 3:17 am

    Hi!

    I’m getting “Not Found – We’re sorry. We recently reorganized our website and the item you are looking for was not found.” message when trying to download this paper. Can you help me with this? I was able to open the document in December but not anymore. I was hoping to use this article in my master’s thesis.

    Please, answer me by email, if possible. Thanks!

  6. The Five As of Social Media Measurement – Zoetica Media — March 6th, 2014 at 12:38 pm

    […] Attitudes. This measure is all about conversation about you. You can measure online sentiment to get a crude idea of where you stand with the community over time, mostly positive, mostly negative and mostly neutral. However, sentiment doesn’t give a full view and can be significantly skewed if you use automated sentiment tools. You can look also at customer satisfaction surveys and cross tab with their involvement with social media sources, loyalty over time, and repeat visits to get an idea of attitudes. The gold standard is conducting a relationships survey. […]

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